The Kids Can Talk

Children have a remarkable number of questions every single day, and since we are home together, they ask me.

My children and I talk about a lot of things -- whatever ever comes to mind, really. It occurred to me recently that this isn't the norm for most families. Children have a remarkable number of questions every single day, and since we are home together, they usually ask me. I also pose questions and let them in on what is going on in my head. They know I can't answer every question they ever have, but this is our normal way of living and understanding the world.

It is Sanctity of Human Life Sunday as I write this.

The most significant reason for homeschooling is the opportunity for parents to be the biggest influence in their children's lives. (I'll write more about this subject in another upcoming post.) I, therefore, have the time to teach my children things they may not have learned in a traditional school setting.

cannon-340237_640We've talked about wars -- past wars and current. We've talked about the Holocaust and Naziism. We've talked about slavery and the Civil Rights movement and African-American heroes like Harriet Tubman. We talk about mental health and disease. We talk about dinosaurs and evolution theories and whether language rules are set in stone.

I've told them that some babies are deliberately aborted.

They were surprised at this, just as they've been surprised about some other news -- such as the killing of Jews. They asked where this was happening and why weren't the perpetrators put in jail. I explained to them that it happens everywhere and that it is not against the law -- to their astonishment. We talked about the Supreme Court and Roe v. Wade and efforts to change the law.

640px-Oblique_facade_3,_US_Supreme_CourtThis was a normal conversation in our house. Actually, it was more than one conversation, since the topic of babies comes up in our house quite regularly. I did, however, plan for a time to talk in depth and seriously about abortion and the law as part of our homeschool. I highly recommend doing so.

Santa Claus, the Easter Bunny, the Stork -- all exist for us to avoid our children's questions.

There's no need to scare your children with weird photos or detailed descriptions of war-related tragedies. Fear is not the point. You know your children and can decide how much information to give them based on that.

Santa Claus, the Easter Bunny, the Stork -- all exist for us to avoid our children's questions. I propose we answer them, and we show them where to look. It won't destroy their innocence. My children have gone on from these talks to laugh and play and be carefree as children are even though they know there is something seriously wrong with the world. Kids are uniquely capable of trusting Jesus in that way.


 

I've written (and am writing) several stories for my children in answer to some of their tougher questions -- like what do daddies have to do with making babies. I will make some of those available to you soon.