Pro-choice is Pro-life Isn't It?

I was just thinking of a paper I planned to write in high school. I say planned to because I think I ended up settling on something else after talking with my English teacher. My thesis was that pro-choice should be pro-life because the only choice a mother would make about her child, that is, her offspring, would be to give him life -- or the best chance at life she could. It seemed irrational that anyone would willingly terminate their own son or daughter, even if given the choice. Prochoice should be pro-life, pro-life should be prochoice. Given the options of life or death, there is only one reasonable choice.

I remember trying to explain my point to my teacher. It seemed so obvious to me, but it wasn't to him. Either that or he tried hard not to show it was obvious to him too. I have to admit I suspected the latter, and I found it frustrating -- like speaking without being heard at all.

The fact that even within such a repressive environment the culture of life has not been overcome -- and more so, has thrived -- is beautiful and fills me with resilient hope.

I may have pushed through with that paper, and I may not have. I did tend to push the envelope with topics throughout high school and college. Still, there's something beautiful about the understanding of youth that I am glad I can remember. As we approach another March for Life this week, led significantly by teens and twenty-somethings, it's been encouraging to see their enthusiasm and hopefulness and under-cluttered reason.

I loved my time in school (well, it was more of a love-hate thing) and my teachers and professors, but thinking on your own about certain things -- like faith and sin, the absolute goodness of God and the Creator-endowed inherent value of humankind -- was swimming upstream in most of my classes. The fact that even within such a repressive environment the culture of life has not been overcome -- and more so, has thrived -- is beautiful and fills me with resilient hope.