A Minority of the Minority

When you think of a homeschool family you probably have a particular image in mind.

When you think of a homeschool family you probably have a particular image in mind. Something like a white couple in their late forties/early fifties with 10 children in homemade clothing, living on a ranch or farm in a large, immaculate, though simple, home. Every member is always neatly dressed and groomed, complete with everlasting smiles and only the kindest words. Walking into that house is like stepping out onto a quiet beach...800px-Furuzamami_beach_Okinawa_Zamami

Walking into that house is like stepping out onto a quiet beach.

My kids built a beach in one of the bedrooms in our house. I meant to take a picture so I could show you guys. They initially made a tent room by taking every single blanket, sheet, and pillow out of the linen closet and draping it all over the room just so.

Later, without my noticing, they decided to make a beach -- either instead of or next to the tents. As far as I could tell the beach room was exactly the same as the tent room except the beach had several rolls of toilet paper added and the two mattresses that belong in that room removed. I still wonder how they got the mattresses down the hallway so inconspicuously. They were crib/toddler size, but still, I'm surprised I didn't hear much banging -- some banging, of course, is to be expected in the normal course of living.

We do have a peaceful home, but it is a different kind of peace. It's quite loud a lot of the time. One of the rooms is a LEGO room. I think it's supposed to be the formal Living Room. You can sit in there, but watch your step. That's not a colorful carpet; the floor is actually covered in LEGO.

We do have a peaceful home, but it is a different kind of peace.

I love the Duggar family, but besides being a largish homeschooling family, we are not much like them -- I mean, the TV them. If we had a reality TV series, it would certainly be short-lived; that is, unless people wanted to watch kids build stuff with LEGO every week.

hero-152842_1280Some people who find out that we are homeschooling say something like 'good for you,' 'if you're talented in that way.' They mean, of course, that there must be something different about us, some super power that gives us the ability to have our children at home all day. Perhaps there is, but I must say, I've never come across it. I want to tell them, no, there's nothing special you need. Homeschooling is just as possible (and impossible) as any other work you are called to do.


You're not good at organization -- ok. You can't add -- fine. You're easily frustrated -- ok. You live in a small apartment with no overhead lights -- so.


 

Let them see you and know you. Let them struggle through life with you, watching you, imitating you.

I have a mental illness.

The kids are  fine. Let them see you and know you. Let them struggle through life with you, watching you, imitating you. If you need a break, fine, send your kids to a school, but it's not because you must. It's not because you are not enough.

Our choice to homeschool is a simple one: influence. My husband and I want to be the primary influence in our children's lives while they're children. This includes not letting them be away from one or both of us for long stretches of time.

Don't ask me about the public school district we live in. I don't know much if anything about the nearby private schools either. We play at the local school playgrounds, and we took a look at stats when home buying -- for the sake of resale value. I have nothing against the school systems (public, charter, or private) or teachers or buses or people in general.

My children are my children. That's all.

So I'm black, experience serious mood shifts, and didn't read any books when I was in elementary school. Am I qualified to teach my kids -- yep.


By the way, they make the books so that the kids could practically teach themselves. Want to learn something new? Redo some subject from your school days? There's a curriculum for that. There's like a g'zillion of 'em.